Creative Writing Prompts to Make Kids Want to Write

Try any one of these prompts either as an individual or group exercise. You might even make copies of all the prompts and make the writing an outside assignment. Feel free to use these prompts in any way you like. You may click here for a list of journal prompts as well.

Do you have plenty of friends? How many friends are plenty?
Tell about a vacation or day trip you have taken.

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Try any one of these prompts either as an individual or group exercise. You might even make copies of all the prompts and make the writing an outside assignment. Feel free to use these prompts in any way you like. You may click here for a list of journal prompts as well.

  1. Do you have plenty of friends? How many friends are plenty?
  2. Tell about a vacation or day trip you have taken.
  3. Describe your favorite animal.
  4. Tell about your grandpa, grandma, or old uncle or aunt whom you like.
  5. What do you like about your favorite teacher?
  6. What do you dislike about lunch at your school?
  7. How many pets do you have and what are their names? If you don’t have pets, why?
  8. What do you like that comes in your favorite color?
  9. Describe your family members who live with you.
  10. Describe Sunday dinner at your house.
  11. Describe the best tree you ever saw. Could you climb it?
  12. If you could build a clubhouse, tree house, or fort, how would you build it?
  13. What is your favorite game and how do you play it?
  14. What sport do you play the worst?
  15. What sport are you good at?
  16. Do you have a favorite pair of shoes? Why do you like them so much?
  17. Tell about one of your daydreams.
  18. Who is your favorite superhero? Why?
  19. Why can girls do things as good as boys can?
  20. Why are we all different from one another in small ways?

As always, thanks for reading and very good writing luck to you.  Written by Pea Green.

Click on the image to buy at least the coolest learning aid we have ever seen, story prompt dice.dice

 

Here is a link to Amazon where you will find a fabulous selection of writing curriculum texts for students of all ages.  

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Deadly Good Descriptive Writing Guide

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Descriptive Writing

A lone writer slumps across a desk, cradling an old timely typewriter. White light fused through a green shade arcs light across a slice of room, gently illuminating the writer. Stale cigarette smoke and bourbon breath permeate the air of the small, over-full room. The floor is papered with partially used sheets from the typewriter, some crinkled, some smooth, some under the writer’s chair’s wheels, branded with tire marks. The cheap ticking sound of a Dollar Store battery-operated clock is audible when the traffic from the street below ebbs between changes of the stoplight. Yesterday’s cheese and crackers, or something that looks like it might once have been cheese and crackers, lays upon a chipped white saucer. A cigarette butt ground into a piece of cheese stands like some version of a flag.

The previous passage is an example of descriptive writing. Descriptive writing is also referred to as a word picture. Word pictures are organized around space, unlike any other type of writing, and they seek to provide the reader with a sensory experience of the topic of the writing. Word pictures may also set the scene for creative writing pieces. Writing and writing classes often begin with descriptive writing because it is one of the easiest and most useful types of writing, which is not to say that it is easy, merely that for some writers it can be less difficult than other types of writing. Note in the paragraph above that the most memorable and compelling parts of the paragraph appeal to one of the five senses: sight, smell, hearing, touch, and taste. Of these, taste and touch are the hardest to incorporate into descriptive writing, unless your topic is food. So, descriptive writing, then, is writing that paints a word picture using appeals to the five senses and organized around space because space, and what does or does not occupy it, is what is written about.

Descriptive writing is of two sorts; subjective and objective. In an objective description, the writer includes only descriptive information that any observer could see. In a subjective description, the writer includes not just the obvious physical details of a scene, but also his/her personal opinions and observations about it. Both types of description rely on adverbs, words that describe verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs, and adjectives, words that describe nouns and other substantives and tell what kind or how many. Most writing requires spare use of adverbs and adjectives, but description is made of them, so use them as lavishly as you like in your writing, but, please, use them accurately so your word picture peels off the page and dances in the imagination of the reader.

Suitable topics for descriptive writing follow, but first, just a brief word on topics. The suitability of a topic is determined not just by what it is about but also by what it isn’t about. When working on your topic statement or thesis statement, remember to keep the topic narrow enough to fit into the page limit. For instance, politics is a whole subject not suitable for an essay of two or three pages, but Oklahoma politics since the ALEC and the Kochs’ money took over the State House, is narrow enough to fit into a few pages. One more time, health is too broad a topic for a short paper, but hospice care in Oklahoma since 2014 is narrow enough to fit into a short paper. By all means, write about anything you want, but make sure that you can give the topic the space it needs to be fully examined. Accomplish that by narrowing your topic in the very beginning of the writing.

  1. The best meal I ever ate was. . .
  2. The prettiest thing I have ever seen was. . .
  3. The thing I like most about my looks is. . .
  4. The most eccentric person I have ever known was. . .
  5. The best teacher I ever had looked like. . .
  6. My bedroom looks like. . .
  7. My car looks like. . .
  8. The Grand Canyon looks. . .
  9. The ocean is. . .
  10. My car is so dirty that. . .
  11. My most ugly boyfriend/girlfriend looked like. . .
  12. When I look at a painting, I see. . .
  13. When I look outside, I see. . .

By Karlane Kraner and Forest Green, staff writers

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Creative Writing Prompts to Awaken Even Dead Creative People

If you like a little foreplay to get your motor running, have some fun with these. Don’t say we didn’t warn you that they are what we like to call, “outside the mainstream” where we live. Who do you really, really detest? Why, and what might you do about it someday. Think up your own version of The Great Train Robbery and write down the plan. Then build a novel around the heist. Sure, heist stories have been written before

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If you like a little foreplay to get your motor running, have some fun with these. Don’t say we didn’t warn you that they are what we like to call, “outside the mainstream” where we live. You may click here to go to some prompts for younger writers.

  1. Who do you really, really detest? Why, and what might you do about it someday.
  2. Think up your own version of The Great Train Robbery and write down the plan. Then build a novel around the heist. Sure, heist stories have been written before. Hell, after Shakespeare put his quill down, as they say, it was all written. But with strong characterization, complex plot twists, and taut suspense throughout, you just might write something good. I detest people who pigeonhole genre fiction because the best of everything written could be placed in a genre, and then so what?
  3. What part of your brother-in-law would you fix if you could? Would you fix him and then maybe do the same favor for your immediate friends? How about your partner’s flaws? Would you fix them as well if you could? How far would it all go?
  4. Since we are living 7 billion to a planet made for 3 billion, how will we solve the overpopulation problem, the elephant in the room that one no one wants to talk about? To what lengths do you believe people will go to curb the birth rate?
  5. Have you ever cheated on your partner? Describe what would happen if you were discovered.
  6. Invent a character with a secret, make it a horrible secret, and then write about how far you would go if it were your secret to protect.
  7. Imagine that you awoke tomorrow morning in Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, or Libya, and you are the appropriate ethnicity for the country you choose, and you can speak the language. However, you have no money, you are ignorant of even the simplest customs, and you are very old and very infirm, so much that walking out of where you are is impossible. Find a way back.
  8. You went out in the woods with some friends to camp and your buzz on, and whilst you were wasted, one of your party went missing. You all search but no matter what you do, you can’t get a phone signal, and you can’t find the missing guy. When you return to camp, your camp gear is gone, and the spot looks untouched. What happens next?
  9. The love of your life loves someone else. Your love will forever be unrequited. An opportunity comes up for you to buy the house next door to your unrequited love and his or her partner. What do you do, and how does it all shake out? Is it more painful never to see the love, or is it more painful to be apart?
  10. You have just hit and killed a person walking alongside the roadway in the dark. You are a little buzzed. You stop and learn your victim is dead. You tell yourself that it was his fault for being on the road, and you drive away. Early the next morning, the sheriff is at your door because the walker’s phone recorded everything, including your face and part of your license tag. What happens next?
  11. You are living in your car in a major city. You have a job, but you can’t get a place to live until you get a paycheck. There is a perverse rich man who patrols the areas where homeless people can park their cars to sleep in them without drawing attention from the police, and he finds people like you who don’t know how to be homeless, who have just had a setback this one time, and he tempts them because they are economically helpless maybe for the first time and vulnerable in a way they may never be again. What are you willing to do for this man to get a safe place of your own to live and shower in? What do you think this man could compel others to do in exchange for getting off the street?
  12. You are a talented professional dancer in the prime of your career. Yesterday, you were in a wreck and your legs had to be amputated. Your drunken partner was driving. You thought your partner was sober. What will you do next?
  13. My Cherokee grandfather told a story about two wolves. These two wolves live within us all. One wolf is angry, hungry, snarling, and quick to fight. The other wolf is calm, a reliable part of the pact in hunts, satisfied with the pieces of meat he gets, and quick to mend riffs in the pack. These wolves struggle against each other inside of us. When asked which wolf wins the struggle, Grandfather said, “The one you feed.” Write a beautiful poem or story about that struggle.

As always, thank you for reading, and use these prompts in any way you like, by Ricardo Verde.  

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