Creative Writing Prompts to Make Kids Want to Write

Try any one of these prompts either as an individual or group exercise. You might even make copies of all the prompts and make the writing an outside assignment. Feel free to use these prompts in any way you like. You may click here for a list of journal prompts as well.

Do you have plenty of friends? How many friends are plenty?
Tell about a vacation or day trip you have taken.

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Try any one of these prompts either as an individual or group exercise. You might even make copies of all the prompts and make the writing an outside assignment. Feel free to use these prompts in any way you like. You may click here for a list of journal prompts as well.

  1. Do you have plenty of friends? How many friends are plenty?
  2. Tell about a vacation or day trip you have taken.
  3. Describe your favorite animal.
  4. Tell about your grandpa, grandma, or old uncle or aunt whom you like.
  5. What do you like about your favorite teacher?
  6. What do you dislike about lunch at your school?
  7. How many pets do you have and what are their names? If you don’t have pets, why?
  8. What do you like that comes in your favorite color?
  9. Describe your family members who live with you.
  10. Describe Sunday dinner at your house.
  11. Describe the best tree you ever saw. Could you climb it?
  12. If you could build a clubhouse, tree house, or fort, how would you build it?
  13. What is your favorite game and how do you play it?
  14. What sport do you play the worst?
  15. What sport are you good at?
  16. Do you have a favorite pair of shoes? Why do you like them so much?
  17. Tell about one of your daydreams.
  18. Who is your favorite superhero? Why?
  19. Why can girls do things as good as boys can?
  20. Why are we all different from one another in small ways?

As always, thanks for reading and very good writing luck to you.  Written by Pea Green.

Click on the image to buy at least the coolest learning aid we have ever seen, story prompt dice.dice

 

Here is a link to Amazon where you will find a fabulous selection of writing curriculum texts for students of all ages.  

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Creative Writing Prompts Images

There are so many books of writing prompts available for sale already that we couldn’t bear to just write another list, so we have approached this prompt list in a new way. We have images and we ask you to write about them. We don’t expect a bunch of independent thinkers to goose-step to our ideas, so just write what you want to write and know that we know how you are and we would expect no less than a daily mutiny or two.

<p style=”textalign: left;”><strong><span style=”color: #000000;”>Creative Writing Prompts Based on Images

by Karlane Kraner and Jeanne Green

Greetings Writers:

There are so many books of writing prompts available for sale already that we couldn’t bear to just write another list, so we have approached this prompt list in a new way. We have images and we ask you to write about them. We don’t expect a bunch of independent thinkers to goose-step to our ideas, so just write what you want to write and know that we know how you are and we would expect no less than a daily mutiny or two. Remember that this is for fun and creativity enhancement, so try to enjoy yourself. If these prompts don’t suit you, we have other such lists posted on this website. Click here for more choices.

 

Seshat is the Egyptian Goddess of Writing, or Scribe of the Gods. Seshat is the Egyptian Goddess of Writing, or Scribe of the Gods.

  1. This stone carving is a representation of the Egyptian Goddess Seshat, goddess of writing, or “scribe of the Gods.” Note she holds a stylus in her hand. Given her privileged status, what issues troubled Seshat? What did she think about lying in bed before sleep? 

 

characters

2. Choose any or all of the characters represented above and write an epic tale. You make want to name the asses after your in-laws, although we would never do so. If you don’t want to write an epic tale, not even for your children, nieces and nephews, or even just some lonely kids in the neighborhood, then draw your own poster of characters. Send us a copy if you do.

dock 

3. There is an old woman about to walk to the end of this dock. What is she doing?

editor

4. Do you know this guy riding the pencil’s end? What does he do in your life? If you had to, how would you, or one of your characters, kill him?

reader rosie

5. There is a guy next door who has this image hanging in front of his dart board in his living room. Why does it hang there?

a-ccraip03_ghost_dance_participants  

6. This is an ancient cave painting representing the Ghost Dance. What else is going on in this painting? Why was it painted? Who visits it everyday?

blameawoman

7. We like to call this painting, “always blame a woman,” and we want you to explain in a short story or novella who this woman is and what she is being blamed for. Just forget about who she is really supposed to be (yes, we know). The man in the reddish breeches has framed her for something, and we would like to know what.

funnymonks

8. Is this pornography? Why is the monk behind Big Nuts holding him by the waist? Ignoring the unfortunate caption, what was really going on in this image? 

4clvr

9. There was this man who was too lucky. He went to the pub every evening and he told endless stories about how he was too lucky. What were some of the stories, and why did his luck never make him happy?

catgeneral

10. How is this kitty rise to the rank of Cat General? He holds a secret, too. What is it?

guystalking

11. What are these men talking about? Do they come to this diner often? Why?

memory 

12. How does this painting make you feel? What is the world like where clocks melt? What was the painter trying to communicate?

tree

13. Why does no grass grow in this yard?

childscream homerscream thescream2

Bonus Prompt: Who is unhappier and why?

Click here to buy one of the many books full of prompts from Amazon.

As always, thanks for reading. images (5)

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Deadly Good Descriptive Writing Guide

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Descriptive Writing

A lone writer slumps across a desk, cradling an old timely typewriter. White light fused through a green shade arcs light across a slice of room, gently illuminating the writer. Stale cigarette smoke and bourbon breath permeate the air of the small, over-full room. The floor is papered with partially used sheets from the typewriter, some crinkled, some smooth, some under the writer’s chair’s wheels, branded with tire marks. The cheap ticking sound of a Dollar Store battery-operated clock is audible when the traffic from the street below ebbs between changes of the stoplight. Yesterday’s cheese and crackers, or something that looks like it might once have been cheese and crackers, lays upon a chipped white saucer. A cigarette butt ground into a piece of cheese stands like some version of a flag.

The previous passage is an example of descriptive writing. Descriptive writing is also referred to as a word picture. Word pictures are organized around space, unlike any other type of writing, and they seek to provide the reader with a sensory experience of the topic of the writing. Word pictures may also set the scene for creative writing pieces. Writing and writing classes often begin with descriptive writing because it is one of the easiest and most useful types of writing, which is not to say that it is easy, merely that for some writers it can be less difficult than other types of writing. Note in the paragraph above that the most memorable and compelling parts of the paragraph appeal to one of the five senses: sight, smell, hearing, touch, and taste. Of these, taste and touch are the hardest to incorporate into descriptive writing, unless your topic is food. So, descriptive writing, then, is writing that paints a word picture using appeals to the five senses and organized around space because space, and what does or does not occupy it, is what is written about.

Descriptive writing is of two sorts; subjective and objective. In an objective description, the writer includes only descriptive information that any observer could see. In a subjective description, the writer includes not just the obvious physical details of a scene, but also his/her personal opinions and observations about it. Both types of description rely on adverbs, words that describe verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs, and adjectives, words that describe nouns and other substantives and tell what kind or how many. Most writing requires spare use of adverbs and adjectives, but description is made of them, so use them as lavishly as you like in your writing, but, please, use them accurately so your word picture peels off the page and dances in the imagination of the reader.

Suitable topics for descriptive writing follow, but first, just a brief word on topics. The suitability of a topic is determined not just by what it is about but also by what it isn’t about. When working on your topic statement or thesis statement, remember to keep the topic narrow enough to fit into the page limit. For instance, politics is a whole subject not suitable for an essay of two or three pages, but Oklahoma politics since the ALEC and the Kochs’ money took over the State House, is narrow enough to fit into a few pages. One more time, health is too broad a topic for a short paper, but hospice care in Oklahoma since 2014 is narrow enough to fit into a short paper. By all means, write about anything you want, but make sure that you can give the topic the space it needs to be fully examined. Accomplish that by narrowing your topic in the very beginning of the writing.

  1. The best meal I ever ate was. . .
  2. The prettiest thing I have ever seen was. . .
  3. The thing I like most about my looks is. . .
  4. The most eccentric person I have ever known was. . .
  5. The best teacher I ever had looked like. . .
  6. My bedroom looks like. . .
  7. My car looks like. . .
  8. The Grand Canyon looks. . .
  9. The ocean is. . .
  10. My car is so dirty that. . .
  11. My most ugly boyfriend/girlfriend looked like. . .
  12. When I look at a painting, I see. . .
  13. When I look outside, I see. . .

By Karlane Kraner and Forest Green, staff writers

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